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Nanolab in the News

  • Simulation demonstrates how exposure to plasma makes carbon nanotubes grow

    At the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), research performed with collaborators from Princeton University and the Institute for Advanced Computational Science at the State University of New York at Stony Brook has shown how plasma causes exceptionally strong, microscopic structures known as carbon nanotubes to grow. Such tubes, measured in billionths of a meter, are found in everything from electrodes to dental implants and have many advantageous properties. In principle, they have a tensile strength, or resistance to breaking when stretched, 100 times greater than that of a same-sized length of steel wire... read more at pppl.gov
    August 11, 2017
    Source: pppl.gov

  • American scientist about Laboratory for Plasma Nanosynthesis

    Too small to be seen by the human eye, nanoparticles are already transforming many scientific fields, from electrical engineering to materials science. Now scientists are working to optimize production.... read more at americanscientist.org
    March, 2017
    Source: americanscientist.org

  • PPPL scientist uncovers physics behind plasma-etching process

    Physicist Igor Kaganovich at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and collaborators have uncovered some of the physics that make possible the etching of silicon computer chips, which power cell phones, computers, and a huge range of electronic devices. Specifically, the team found how electrically charged gas known as plasma makes the etching process more effective than it would otherwise be... read more at phys.org
    January 27, 2017
    Source: www.phys.org

  • Roberto Car elected as a member of the National Academy of Sciences

    Roberto Car, the Ralph W. *31 Dornte Professor in Chemistry and the Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials, has been elected as a member of the National Academy of Sciences for his distinguished achievements in scientific research.... read more at chemistry.princeton.edu
    May 3, 2016
    Source: chemistry.princeton.edu

  • Roberto Car received the American Chemical Society (ACS) Award in Theoretical Chemistry

    Roberto Car, the Ralph W. *31 Dornte Professor in Chemistry and the Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials, has been elected as a member of the National Academy of Sciences for his distinguished achievements in scientific research.... read more at acs.org
    January 4, 2016
    Source: acs.org

  • PPPL receives $4.3 million to increase understanding of the role that plasma plays in synthesizing nanoparticles

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has received some $4.3 million of DOE Office of Science funding, over three years, to develop an increased understanding of the role of plasma in the synthesis of nanoparticles.... read more at pppl.gov
    June 9, 2014
    Source: pppl.gov

  • Nanotechnology at PPPL

    Nanomaterials, which are measured in billionths of a meter, are prized for their use in everything from golf clubs and swimwear to microchips, paints and pharmaceutical products, thanks to their singular properties. These include exceptional strength and flexibility and high electrical conductivity. Carbon nanotubes, for example, are tens of thousands of times thinner than a human hair, yet are stronger than steel on an ounce-per-ounce basis.
    PPPL researchers have launched a nanotechnology laboratory that they envision as a step toward research capabilities that could serve as a resource for institutions and industries around the world..... read more at pppl.gov
    Source: pppl.gov

  • Nano meets plasma at PPPL

    Scientists at DOE's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have launched a new effort to apply expertise in plasma to study and optimize the use of the hot, electrically charged gas as a tool for producing nanoparticles. This research aims to advance the understanding of plasma-based synthesis processes, and could lead to new methods for creating high-quality nanomaterials at relatively low cost..... read more at DOE Pulse
    October 22, 2012
    Source: DOE pulse